The Dereliction of the Son

The dereliction presents us with an unthinkable scenario: the eternally beloved Son of God cries out to his Father, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” How ought this astonishing reality be understood? Has the divine nature suffered? Or might it be said that the person of the Logos himself did not suffer, but only the human nature which is associated with him? Did the Father—however briefly it may have been—turn his back on his eternally beloved Son and switch to hating him? As inconceivable as it may seem, in the dereliction the eternal Logos is experiencing, through his human nature and as a representative substitute, a sense of the withdrawal of the divine love and delight, and a sense of the divine judgment—and this so that the judgment and wrath hanging over sinful man would be taken away forever. First I will place the dereliction within the broader story of Scripture in order to cast light on its meaning and significance, then I will deal with some mistaken views of the dereliction. Continue reading The Dereliction of the Son

The Chiastic Structure of James

James’ epistle is often viewed as a somewhat haphazard collection of fragmented thoughts, with no apparent structure or order. He moves from one topic to another, and we know not why.

Admittedly, James does not write in the form of an argumentative discourse. His letter is more like a collection of wisdom sayings. It even more closely resembles a series of teachings like one encounters in the Sermon on the Mount (which James draws from pervasively). But this does not mean that the book has no structure. James is a chiasm. At least, I think so.

Continue reading The Chiastic Structure of James

The Brothers Karamazov: 17 Quotes

dostoevsky

This summer I read through Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov. Dostoevsky is one of my favorite authors, and this is one of my all-time favorite books. It’s a classic for a reason: in this book there meets together beauty and ugliness, grandeur and the mundane, good and evil, death and life, suffering and salvation. It functions as a compelling apologetic for the Christian faith in a secular age.

I wanted to share seventeen memorable quotes from the book. There are massive limits to what I’m doing here. It’s a novel, after all. These brief excerpts cannot capture the impact of a whole chapter or section or how masterfully Dostoevsky develops a theme, image, or character through the whole book.

Nevertheless, there are lots of great quotes to be found. Here are seventeen that stood out to me: Continue reading The Brothers Karamazov: 17 Quotes